David Hopkins at Bendigo South East College

9 09 2011

David spoke to all teachers from BSSC 4pm to 6pm at BSE on 7/9/11 and to leading teachers from BSSC at BSSC from 2.30 to 3.30 on Thursday 8/9/11.

In the first part of the meeting on Wednesday 7/9/11 Ron Lake spoke to assembled staff and highlighted challenges for teachers in the Bendigo area. In particular written literacy was an area that was well below where it should be and the uptake of mathematics in later years was poor. With regards to BSSC staff it indicated the likely challenge as being to continue to work on literacy skills across the board with all students and in addition attract more students to complete higher level maths.

David’s message was interesting but not new. He in fact claimed that he was not presenting anything fundamentally ground breaking but rather emphasising known good practices.  With regards to BSSC in particular (on the Thursday) he emphasised that our content was fine, but what we needed to work on was our pedagogy.  He described five areas of teaching which I’ve listed below. In particular I found the description of operating within a students “zone of proximal development” a valuable idea for achieving good outcomes. This idea is discussed in greater depth in his book “Every School a Great School”.  Reference to this can be found at http://www.davidhopkins.co.uk/books.htm.  Some of the pages re this topic can be seen through book previews at Google Books. David also referred to John Hattie’s book “Visible Learning” and it’s a book which on first glance appears to be a valuable summary or synthesis of existing educational research ( a little like Marzano’s “What works in schools”).

1) INTENTIONS, PACE AND NARRATIVE

When teachers set learning intentions, use appropriate pace, and have a clear and strong narrative about their teaching, then students are more secure about their learning, and achievement, understanding and curiosity is increased.

2) TASKS

When learning tasks are purposeful, clearly defined, differentiated and challenging ( according to the student’s zone of proximal development) then the more powerful, progressive and precise the learning for all students.

3) HIGHER ORDER QUESTIONS

Teachers systematically using high order questioning leads to the level of student understanding deepening and the level of engagement increasing. Students who are regularly required to analyse, synthesise and evaluate are more motivated and engaged.

4) FEEDBACK AND DATA

Using feedback to inform future learning.

5) FEEDBACK AND REFLECTION

Peer assessment

6) COLLABORATIVE GROUP WORK

Cooperative group structures to mediate between whole class instruction and students carrying out tasks.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: